26 June Campaign: How two survivors of Rwandan Genocide overcame the scars of the past

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It is time to put a face to torture victims and reclaim their need for and right to rehabilitation – a right guaranteed under the UN Convention against Torture. As part of this year’s 26 June campaign, we are sharing the stories of survivors and care providers to show how providing rehabilitation services to torture survivors is a right and responsibility for all.   

In 2014 the IRCT published the stories of ten women who experienced sexual violence and torture during the 100 days of the 1994 Rwandan Genocide. Today we are sharing the stories of two men who have worked with rehabilitation centres, Association for Research and Assistance for Africa Mission (ARAMA) and Uyisenga Ni Imanzi to rebuild their lives following the torture and trauma they endured during the genocide.

Bernard

“I was eight years old when the genocide happened. When my entire family was killed, a neighbor took care of me. I was wounded on my leg, and the scars did not heal. Throughout my school years, the wound would open all the time and suffered from infections. I could barely walk and although I am schooled in car-mechanics, I could not find a job. I did not feel like talking to anyone, and I was an outsider in my community. I had no friends and felt so lonely. I started to suffer from depression.

Bernard (courtesy of the IRCT)

Bernard (courtesy of the IRCT)

“A few years ago, I met ARAMA. ARAMA decided to help me and send me to the military hospital of Kanombe where my leg was operated on. They continued to be there for me and gave me medicines and therapeutic shoes. I can’t describe how it felt to walk without pain. They also gave me psychological and psychosocial support.

“Before I met ARAMA, I couldn’t sleep. I was afraid of the bad memories that always come at night when I sleep. Since last week, I started to sleep again and the nightmares are gone! Thanks to ARAMA, I don’t feel alone anymore, and I have started to talk to other people again. I feel so much better now.”

Emanuel Raduka
“The genocide made me an orphan. I was 18 years old and all of a sudden I became the head of the household, with three little brothers to take care of. I was not ready to become a parent. You need a lot of strength to become your brothers’ father. When the perpetrators took my father’s land, we were left with nothing. For a long time I was sad, hopeless and very angry about what happened.

Emanuel Raduka (courtesy of the IRCT)

Emanuel Raduka (courtesy of the IRCT)

“When Uyisenga Ni Imanzi came, they were the first to tell us that there was still hope for us. They gave us and other orphans counselling and taught us how to farm and grow maniocs and pineapples. Together with the other orphans we created a cooperation called ‘Duhozanye’. Being a member of the cooperation feels good, we have enough to eat and we can even save some money for the future. In ‘Duhozanye’ we talk a lot and can understand each other’s problems.

“We are not alone anymore. Uyisenge Ni Imanzi helped me and my brothers get our land back and they helped my brothers go back to school. My brothers now go to university. For us, Uyisenga Ni Imanzi got us out of the darkness and gave us hope for the future. They helped me chase away the sadness and the hatred. Sometimes, I lose my strength and then everything turns bad. But the staff at Uyisenga are like parents for me, and when these bad feelings come up, they are always there to give me hope again.”

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  1. #1 by Jonathan R. on 11/06/2015 - 17:11

    Very powerful stories. Thanks for sharing.

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