Creating a world without torture: November in review

We round-up our blogs from November and don’t forget to keep checking the blog in the coming weeks for more. Click here to visit our Facebook page, and here to visit our Twitter feed.

World’s largest collection of documents on torture still a well-kept secret

The Documentation Centre and Library holds the world’s most extensive collection of published documents on torture and related subjects.

Only 15 minutes from Copenhagen’s city centre lies a library that, despite a collection that makes others pale in comparison, remains a well-kept secret.

The Documentation Centre and Library holds the world’s most extensive collection of published documents on torture and related subjects.

The DIGNITY Library holds the world’s most extensive collection of published documents on torture and related subjects.

The DIGNITY Library holds the world’s most extensive collection of published documents on torture and related subjects. In fact, the library boasts more than 40,000 items, ranging from books and articles to journals and images.

Learn more about the DIGNITY library here.

 

‘Body Movement Reconnect’ – Interview with STTARS Survivor

‘Body Movement Reconnect’ is a joint initiative between STTARS and Uniting Care Wesley Bowden

A circus is a show featuring colourful, entertaining and often daring acts. A circus aims to amuse, to entertain and to joke.

And a circus is also a method of rehabilitation.

Despite the fun factor, circus acts and similar physical activities are used by IRCT members to encourage confidence, creativity and cooperation among torture survivors.

One particular example of this is the ‘Body Movement Reconnect’ programme, a joint initiative between Australian member STTARS and the group Uniting Care Wesley Bowden.

Read our full blog here.

 

Human Rights Day 2014: Psychosocial Support in Focus – Randy

Randy 2014 © International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims

Marking this year’s Human Rights Day, we cast a light on psychosocial support during legal proceedings — a critical yet neglected area within the fight against impunity and rehabilitation itself.

In the first survivor story we meet Randy (not his real name) who was arrested, blindfolded, beaten and stabbed. Now twenty-seven years old he is still overcoming his torture for allegedly joining a communist militia in the Philippines. With guidance and support Randy overcame his anger and vengeance. Today, he still seeks legal punishment of the perpetrators.

“I want to get justice. Support through the legal process has helped me locate the people who tortured me. I hope they will one day be punished.”

Read the full story here.

 

Human Rights Day 2014: Psychosocial Support in Focus – Veli

Veli 2014 © International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims

In our second survivor story we meet torture victim, Veli Saçilik whose case progressed into a complex back-and-forth case eventually reaching the European Court of Human Rights.

Veli always hoped for a positive outcome in his case – after all, with his right arm missing, the physical scars are obvious.

It was July 2000 when Veli’s story began. One of 60 prisoners in Burdur Prison, south-west Turkey, Veli tried to defend himself against an onslaught of 415 Turkish state forces who, responding to calls from the Prison Governor, fired tear gas and destroyed the prison with bulldozers to prevent what was portrayed as an internal uprising.

Read more here.

 

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